Tag Archives: literature

Episode 105: Popular Theater in Kenya—The Trial of Dedan Kimathi

Professor Mugo at the interviewMicere Githae Mugo (Syracuse, Emeritus) and Simon Gikandi (Princeton) discuss the making and aftermath of The Trial of Dedan Kimathi and, on the 40th anniversary of the play, reflect on the play’s historical and political significance in Kenya and beyond; its innovative elements; and researching, writing, and enacting the play with Ngugi wa Thiong’o and with the community.

Part of a podcast series in collaboration with the U.S. African Studies Association.

Episode 85: Swahili Poetry with Abdilatif Abdalla

Abdilatif_Abdalla_2Abdilatif Abdalla is the best-known Swahili poet and independent Kenya’s first political prisoner. He discusses poetry as a political instrument and as an academic field; publication prospects for African poets; and how poetry enabled him to survive three years of solitary confinement, after which he spent 22 years in exile. The interview ends with Abdalla reciting his poem “Siwati” (“I Will Never Abandon My Convictions”).

With guest host Ann Biersteker.

Episode 9: Maghrebi Women and Ethnopsychiatry

Rita El-Khayat (University of Chieti, Italy) is an anthropologist, psychiatrist, novelist and poet from Morocco. Guest host is Professor Safoi Babana-Hampton (MSU). El-Khayat describes her work on North African women; the study and practice of psychiatry; and the importance of breaking down barriers through cultural mixing (métissage). The interview took place during the conference “Muslims, Race, and the Public Sphere” recently hosted by the Muslim Studies Program at MSU.


Episode 2: African Cinema and Literature

Postcolonial African CinemaThis episode focuses on African football (soccer), cinema, and literature. In the first segment, Peter Alegi reports on the first round of the African Nations Cup in Ghana. In the second segment, MSU Professors Ken Harrow and Safoi Babana-Hampton join us in a discussion centered around Harrow’s new book Postcolonial African Cinema: From Political Engagement to Postmodernism (Indiana University Press, 2007). Issues of authenticity, “truth,” self-expression, and the impact of new media connect the latest trends in African cinema and literature.