Tag Archives: African diaspora

Episode 93: Atlantic Bonds and Biography: from South Carolina to Nigeria

JCV portrait from EbonyLisa Lindsay (North Carolina) on her forthcoming biography of James Churchwill Vaughan—whose life provides insights into the bonds of slavery and family and the differing prospects for people of African descent in the 19th-century Atlantic world. Vaughan’s odyssey took him from slavery-ridden South Carolina to Liberia and finally Nigeria, where he was involved in the Yoruba Wars, led a revolt against white racism, and founded not only the first independent Nigerian church but also a family of activists. With guest host, Laura Fair.

 

Episode 70: The International Politics of Black Liberation

Horne_Edozie_AlegiHistorian Gerald Horne (U. of Houston) on how labor struggles in Hawaii and black self-assertion in Kenya influenced a young Barack Obama; the legacy of African-American involvement in African political struggles; the confluence of African-American Studies and African Studies; and W.E.B. DuBois as a template for unity among people of African descent. With guest co-host Kiki Edozie.

 

Episode 40: Africa’s Global Past

Paul Tiyambe Zeleza (Loyola Marymount University) on the history and study of Africa and its Diasporas. He discusses the themes of his new book, Barack Obama and African Diasporas: Dialogues and Dissensions, as well as globalization and Africa, and changes over time in the nature and focus of African Studies.

Episode 33: The African Diaspora in Britain

afterabolition2007Marika Sherwood (senior research fellow, Institute of Commonwealth Studies, London) on the history of the African diaspora in Britain. She discusses aspects of her 2007 book After Abolition: Britain and the Slave Trade Since 1807, the 1945 Pan Africanist Congress in Manchester, and Pan-African biographies.  Sherwood concludes by noting the inadequate treatment of black history in the UK school curriculum.

Episode 30: Garvey and the African Diaspora

Garvey_UNIA_papers_coverProf. Robert A. Hill (History, UCLA) on his life’s work as editor of The Marcus Garvey and UNIA Papers, a magisterial multi-volume series published by the University of California Press since 1983. Hill discusses the origins of his interest in Garvey and the “Africa for the Africans” movement — the largest organized mass movement in black history.  He sheds light on important editorial issues in the Garvey Papers project and reflects on Garvey’s legacy today.

Episode 11: Ethiopian Diaspora

Solomon Addis GetahunSolomon Addis Getahun (Central Michigan University) discusses the history of Ethiopian immigrants and refugees in the USA. He describes the diversity of Ethiopians in the diaspora and their community organizations. For example, to overcome isolation and carve out an autonomous space within US society, in 1984 Ethiopians established the Ethiopian Sports Federation in North America. Its annual football (soccer) tournament provides a festive place where Ethiopian identity is negotiated, recreated and modified.