Category Archives: Podcast

Episode 89: Digital African Studies Part 2 with Laura Seay

seay-brookings-pic1Laura Seay (Government, Colby College) on becoming a Congo scholar; the genealogy and impact of her “Texas in Africa” blog; using Twitter for academic purposes and public discourse; and her book project titled “Substituting for the State” about non-state actors and governance in eastern DR Congo. Follow Laura on Twitter: @texasinafrica

Episode 88: Digital African Studies with Keith Breckenridge

biometric_stateKeith Breckenridge (WISER) on the current state of digital Southern African Studies; the politics, funding, and ethics of international partnerships in digital projects; and his new book Biometric State: The Global Politics of Identification and Surveillance in South Africa, 1850 to the Present. Follow Keith on Twitter: @BreckenridgeKD

Part I of a series on digital African studies.

Episode 87: Black Politics in South Africa

Dr Chitja TwalaChitja Twala (History, Univ. of Free State) on the history of black politics and the African National Congress in the Free State province; oral history; cultural resistance; the field of History in South Africa; lessons of the Marikana Massacre; and “transformation” in South African higher education.

Episode 86: Cartooning in Africa with Tebogo Motswetla

Mabijo vol. 3Tebogo Motswetla, a leading African cartoonist from Botswana, on his journey of becoming a cartoonist; the 25th anniversary of his character “Mabijo”; applied aspects of his work; seTswana language dialogue; the creative process, censorship, and freedom of expression.

Episode 85: Swahili Poetry with Abdilatif Abdalla

Abdilatif_Abdalla_2Abdilatif Abdalla is the best-known Swahili poet and independent Kenya’s first political prisoner. He discusses poetry as a political instrument and as an academic field; publication prospects for African poets; and how poetry enabled him to survive three years of solitary confinement, after which he spent 22 years in exile. The interview ends with Abdalla reciting his poem “Siwati” (“I Will Never Abandon My Convictions”).

With guest host Ann Biersteker.

Episode 84: African literatures & public intellectuals: Sahara Reporters & ‘What is Africa to me’?

Adesanmi2013profilePICpayopics-2432

Pius Adesanmi (Carleton University) on African literatures, public intellectuals, Sahara Reporters blog, social media and postcolonial writing, Yoruba and Anglophone literatures, ‘imposed transnationalism’ in the African literature classroom and ‘What is Africa to me’?

Photo courtesy of Pius Adesanmi

Episode 83: Conflict in Côte d’Ivoire and Beyond, From High Politics to the Grassroots

IvoryCoast_Obannon

Photo courtesy of Brett O’Bannon.

Brett O’Bannon (Political Science, Director of Conflict Studies, De Pauw University) on the causes and consequences of civil war in Côte d’Ivoire; the “Responsibility to Protect” as applied to conflict in Africa ; and monitoring herder-farmer relations in Senegal to anticipate the onset of wider-scale warfare.

Episode 82: Denis Goldberg’s Life for Freedom in South Africa

Goldberg_Afripod_82Denis Goldberg reflects on his activism, hardships in prison, and the highs and lows of the antiapartheid movement. He was sentenced to life imprisonment in 1963 in South Africa’s Rivonia trial with Mandela and other leaders. He served 22 years in an apartheid prison. Goldberg’s autobiography is titled The Mission: A Life for Freedom in South Africa.

Episode 81: The Nigerian homefront in WWII, The Biafran War, and Igbo Identity

Afripod_81_Korieh_photoDr. Chima Korieh (History, Marquette) on Nigerian experiences on the African homefront during World War II, agriculture and social change in the colonial era, the Biafran War and the politics of memory, and Igbo identity.  The interview closes with a discussion of endangered archives in postcolonial Nigeria.

Episode 80: Biographies and Databases of Atlantic Slaves, Part 2

slavevoyages.orgDavid Eltis, Robert W. Woodruff Professor of History at Emory University, on the making of the Transatlantic Slave Trade database,  a landmark collaborative digital project he has co-edited for two decades. Eltis discusses the research process, online dissemination, and new directions for the initiative. This is the second part of a two-part series recorded at the Atlantic Slave Biographies Database Conference at Michigan State University in November 2013.