Episode 96: Creativity and Decolonization: Nigerian Cultures and African Epistemologies

Toyin Falola (History, Texas; President, African Studies Association) on Yoruba history and culture; language policy in Nigeria; creativity and decolonization; forms of community action in “hyper-modern” times; and the meaning of Buhari’s victory in the 2015 presidential election.

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Episode 95: Nigerian Politics and Society in Cartoon Art

Ganiyu Akinloye Jimoh (Creative Arts, University of Lagos) on his work in Nigeria as a popular cartoonist, with the pen name “Jimga,” and as a cartoon scholar. Issues discussed include: political aspects of cartooning; visual aspects of the art; language and graphic styles; and the future of cartooning in Nigeria.

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Episode 93: Atlantic Bonds and Biography: from South Carolina to Nigeria

Lisa Lindsay (North Carolina) on her forthcoming biography of James Churchwill Vaughan—whose life provides insights into the bonds of slavery and family and the differing prospects for people of African descent in the 19th-century Atlantic world. Vaughan’s odyssey took him from slavery-ridden South Carolina to Liberia and finally Nigeria, where he was involved in the […]

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Episode 81: The Nigerian homefront in WWII, The Biafran War, and Igbo Identity

Dr. Chima Korieh (History, Marquette) on Nigerian experiences on the African homefront during World War II, agriculture and social change in the colonial era, the Biafran War and the politics of memory, and Igbo identity.  The interview closes with a discussion of endangered archives in postcolonial Nigeria.

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Episode 65: A Female King: Gender and Oral History in Eastern Nigeria

Prof. Nwando Achebe (MSU History) on her recent book The Female King of Colonial Nigeria: Ahebi Ugbabe. Achebe describes key aspects of King (or Eze) Ahebi’s life; reflects on the value of oral history and multidisciplinary methods; and discusses Igbo gender, culture, and power during British colonial rule.

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Episode 48: Nigeria, Gender, Labor, and Environment

Judith Byfield (History, Cornell) on the social and economic history of women and the environment in Nigeria. She elaborates on the role of the prominent Kuti family and also on the origins of her scholarly interest in Africa. The interview was recorded during Dr. Byfield’s visit to Michigan State University where she delivered the 2010 […]

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Episode 107: West African Intellectual Heritage

Professor Amidu O. Sanni (Lagos State University) on his work for the Timbuktu Manuscripts Project and preservation of West African intellectual heritage. He discusses the importance of Ajami sources (African languages written in Arabic script) for historical and cultural analysis and suggests possibilities for future research and training initiatives.  

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Episode 15: Capitalism, Democracy, and Development

Kiki Edozie (James Madison College at MSU) compares recent corruption scandals in Nigeria, South Africa, and Kenya.  She argues that democratic crises are closely tied to economic crises. At the end, the implications of these processes for African politics are considered.

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Episode 10: African Soccerscapes

Peter Alegi discusses his book manuscript in process African Soccerscapes: How a Continent Changed the World’s Game (Ohio University Press :Africa in World History Series). Guest host Solomon Getahun and Peter Limb talk with Alegi about football and anti-colonial nationalism in Nigeria, Algeria, and South Africa; the history of migration of African players to Europe; […]

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The Hosts

Peter Limb Dr. Peter Limb is Associate Professor (adjunct) of History and Africana Bibliographer at Michigan State University.  He has published widely on South African history and digitization in Africa.  Recent books include Nelson Mandela: a Biography (2008); Orb and Sceptre: Studies on British Imperialism and its Legacies (2008); Grappling with the Beast: Indigenous Southern […]

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