Episode 108: Ajami in African History

Portrait photo of Fallou Ngom

Courtesy of Boston University Photography

Fallou Ngom (African Languages Director, Boston U.) on his new book Muslims Beyond the Arab World: the Odyssey of Ajami and the Muridiyya. Focusing on Senegambia and Ahmadu Bamba, Ngom discusses Ajami literary texts — African languages in Arabic scripts — as sources for history. He also reflects on creating online Ajami collections, teaching and learning African languages in the U.S., and contributing scholarly expertise to asylum cases.

Note: Part of a podcast series in collaboration with the U.S. African Studies Association.

 

Episode 107: West African Intellectual Heritage

Portrait photo of Prof. SanniProfessor Amidu O. Sanni (Lagos State University) on his work for the Timbuktu Manuscripts Project and preservation of West African intellectual heritage. He discusses the importance of Ajami sources (African languages written in Arabic script) for historical and cultural analysis and suggests possibilities for future research and training initiatives.

 

Episode 106: The 2016 Zambian Elections

Ballot being cast in ZambiaNicholas van der Walle (Cornell) and Michael Wahman (Missouri) analyze the 2016 Zambian presidential and parliamentary elections. The two political scientists discuss the controversial results, the role of the Constitutional Court in the process, violence, and the influence of international election observers. With guest host, Jessica Achberger.

Part of a podcast series in collaboration with the U.S. African Studies Association.

Episode 105: Popular Theater in Kenya—The Trial of Dedan Kimathi

Professor Mugo at the interviewMicere Githae Mugo (Syracuse, Emeritus) and Simon Gikandi (Princeton) discuss the making and aftermath of The Trial of Dedan Kimathi and, on the 40th anniversary of the play, reflect on the play’s historical and political significance in Kenya and beyond; its innovative elements; and researching, writing, and enacting the play with Ngugi wa Thiong’o and with the community.

Part of a podcast series in collaboration with the U.S. African Studies Association.

Episode 104: Development Dreams in Lesotho

John Aerni-Flessner above Maseru

John Aerni-Flessner above Maseru, Lesotho

John Aerni-Flessner (MSU) on his forthcoming book The Desire for Development: Foreign Assistance, Independence, & Dreams for the Nation in Lesotho. Discussion focuses on development projects and their local, national and international politics; perspectives of Basotho youth, farmers, chiefs and government; and interactions with South Africa, U.S. Peace Corps and the foreign aid industry.

Episode 103: On the Ground in Western Sahara

Photo of art installation by Sam Jury

Producing, To Be Here. Photo Sam Jury

Artist Sam Jury on the neglected situation of Sahrawi peoples’ refugee camps, her video installation To Be Here on their daily lives, and about the women who built the camps.

Additional background on the Sahrawi movement is provided by Richard Knight (African Activist Archive).

 

 

Episode 102: Photojournalism and the “Real Story of the Marikana Massacre” with Greg Marinovich

Marikana, North West Province, South Africa. September 5, 2012. Striking Marikana Lonmin miners march to deliever their demands to Lonmin management. They hold up the image of mambush, one of the strike leaders killed by police. Photo Greg Marinovich

Marikana, South Africa. September 5, 2012. Striking Lonmin miners. Photo Greg Marinovich

Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Greg Marinovich (Boston University) on the genealogy and ethics of his work and on his new book: Murder at Small Koppie: The Real Story of the Marikana Massacre—one of the largest killing of civilians in South Africa since 1960.

For more: read the Marikana Commission of Inquiry Report here and watch Miners Shot Down here.

Episode 101: Corpulence, Cartoonists, and Politics

Portrait of Teju OlaniyanTejumola Olaniyan (Wisconsin–Madison) on African cartoonists, their depictions of the body and struggles with censorship, and the aesthetics of corpulence in African political cartooning. He elaborates on the deeper origins and gendered nature of satire in African societies and also discusses his website Africa Cartoons.com.

Episode 100: The Afripod Centenary Special

750px-wv-100-svgThis centenary episode brings together selections from the first eight years of the podcast. The chosen segments broadly represent earliest and latest episodes, different African countries and regions, and notable contributions by local and international guests on a number of subjects and themes.

Episode 99: Artisanal Mining in Tanzania

Rosemarie_MwaipopoAnthropologist Rosemarie Mwaipopo (U. of Dar es Salaam) on artisanal and small-scale mining in Tanzania. She discusses the roles of women;grassroots dimensions, including cultural and gender dynamics; and government policies. The interview concludes with a comparative look at small-scale mining in Africa.